kitchen-backsplash
Written by Eric Brumo

Kitchen Updates on a Budget

A kitchen makeover doesn’t have to break the bank. A complete gut-remodel may not be in the cards, or the budget in the next few years, but let us help you uncover some affordable options. Sometimes freshening things up can make all the difference.

Option #1: Change out countertops. This update is arguably the biggest impact any one action will make in the kitchen. If you have older laminate tops, there is no doubt this will be a huge transformation. It’s not exactly something easy for a DIYer to do alone but can get done on a budget! This is especially achievable if you can find a granite you like. Granite is relatively low-cost and can keep costs low.

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Flooring
Written by Eric Brumo

Flooring 101: What to know about hardwoods

Hardwoods offer an extremely wide range of options, color/stain and quality levels. The achieved result is highly dependent on the purpose/room type, and amount of work a homeowner, or contractor is willing to put into the job.


What are the pros and cons or installing unfinished hardwood flooring vs factory, or prefinished flooring?

A common question I am asked often, and with good reason. The answer is, as with most home improvement projects….it depends.

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Written by Eric Brumo

2019 Kitchen Trends

2018 had no shortage of design trends for one of the most popular rooms in your home. From industrial to ultra-luxurious modern, the styles we saw in the kitchen to be ‘fads’ quickly established themselves as staples…..at least for the next year.

Color is King
Gone are the days of the monochromatic room. Resurgences of bold new color combinations are coming back to create interest and vast array of color pallets for the adventurous designer. One of my favorite, the backsplash. Especially for the apprehensive, take a chance and add a pop of color to what would normally be a neutral pallet. The end results could surprise you!

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Written by Eric Brumo

Why Hire a Licensed Builder?

This is an important decision, and no matter who you use for your home remodeling project, I pray you choose a licensed builder. Now, I understand ‘Bob’ isn’t licensed and he did a good job for your friend Shirley, but let’s dig into this together, shall we?

A licensed builder is easier to vet. In the state of Michigan, a customer can file a complaint against a licensed builder with LARA (licensing and regulatory affairs). These complaints are attached to him and are available to you, as you start the selection process.

He/she must carry the proper insurance needed to operate and pull permits.

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Written by ebbuilding

Insulate your wallet against rising energy costs!

Oh the glory and glamour of insulation! Everyone’s favorite discussion when building comes up. Nothing sexier that I can think of. Now back to reality. No one builds an addition or remodels a kitchen and WANTS to spend money on insulation. It is like gas for your car. You are going to buy it only cause you need it.

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Written by ebbuilding

So many tiles to choose from!

I doubt I can give you much advice on picking your tile patterns or color schemes here today. Cause, you know, this is a blog and I haven’t me you yet! I do believe I can shine some light on the different types of tile you may be considering or will at some point need to consider. Most remodeling projects will require some sort of tile so it is worth a quick read here. Tile comes in an array of material choices. Each a bit different from the other.

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Written by ebbuilding

Why PEX is replacing copper across America and abroad as the favored plumbing material

Copper plumbing has continued to rise in price for decades. Pennies were 95% copper until 1982 when the United States began making pennies of 98% zinc and a copper coating. Synthetic materials have stepped forward as an economical solution to the always rising cost issue of copper. Cross linked polyethylene, PEX, has been around for over 60 years.  It’s been in use in the United States since the 80’s. Originally used for radiant heating systems and now for potable water.

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